This Heart Warming Video From Nivea Proves Mother’s Love Can Be Attained From Anyone

Prasoon Joshi’s beautiful song on Maa from the movie Taare Zameen Par, doesn’t fail to move you each time you listen to these resonating lyrics that remind you of your own mother. The one person in this world who accepts you just the way you are! There’s some large, overwhelming, and beautiful piece at the centre of motherhood that is so hard to put into words. It’s a feeling, not an explanation! Something called ‘mother’s love’!

While Mother’s Day is traditionally celebrated to show love to your own mother, India’s most loved skincare brand NIVEA is going a bit further. “Why can’t we on this Mother’s Day spare a thought to those people in our lives who may not have given birth to us but have showered us with the same kind of mother’s love, caring and warmth”, asks NIVEA. Why not acknowledge the #JustLikeMaa figures in our lives? It could be your long-serving mothered you at the cost of caring for her own children. It could be your sister – always there to listen and share your deepest darkest secrets with. Come to think of it, why not your father? Has he not, beyond his role of being a provider, been there for you, nurtured you, stood by you and defended you against your worst detractors? Aren’t all these people ‘just like maa’? On this Mother’s Day, how about also wishing these ‘just like maa’ figures in your life and thanking them for all the contribution that they have made towards making you who you are today? “Don’t they too deserve their ‘#JustLikeMaa’ day”, asks NIVEA.

It doesn’t matter if she entered your life through family, or he just came into your life to play the mother figure. Whether it is the #JustLikeMaa Yashoda to Krishna or Sita to Lakshman or Mrs.Weasley to Harry Potter or Lata Mangeshkar to Sachin Tendulkar…or #JustLikeMaa Karan Johar to Siddarth, Alia and Varun, tales about #JustLikeMaa are as much a part of real life as they are of history and mythology.

“So who is your #JustLikeMaa figure?” asks NIVEA, through a digital campaign conceptualised by DigitasLBi that includes a film that will tug at the cockles of your heart and bring forth memories of your #JustLikeMaa. Watch the film and if it moves you enough (which we are sure it will), salute your #JustLikeMaa by sharing a special message with her and sharing this video.

Swara Bhaskar Makes Her Web Series Debut With #ItsNotThatSimple

Swara Bhaskar known for her superlative performances in films like Nil Battey Sannata, Prem Ratan Dhan Paayo, Tanu Weds Manu is making her small screen debut with a web series called # It’s Not That Simple. The series premiered on 6 October on Voot, TV 18’s streaming channel.

The web series is about extra-marital affairs with the bold subject of a housewife in a loveless marriage. Along with Swara, there is TV actor Karan Mehra now called Karanveer Mehra, Vivaan Bhatena and Akshay Oberoi. It’s written by Charudutt Acharya and directed by Danish Aslam. Danish had directed the Deepika Padukone and Imran Khan starrer Break Ke Baad. Danish also happens to husband of TV actress Shruti Seth. The show ‘Its Not That Simple’ is a six part web series divided into three episodes.

After watching light hearted content on the web, this is a mature, one-of-its-kind show. Do check it out!

The Walking Dead Season 7- Who Did Negan Kill?

The anticipation surrounding a new season of The Walking Dead has never been this high. And it can be attributed to the season 6 finale cliffhanger- one in which Negan has killed a major character, but the identity of his victim is still unknown.

Could it be Daryl? Norman Reedus, the actor playing Daryl, has thrown some considerable nuggets as to whether his character could be Negan’s victim. He’s recently said how fans will be ‘kicking their TV sets’ following the season seven opener, which would certainly be the only rational way to react following Daryl’s demise, and has also cryptically teased ‘mistakes will end your life’ when asked what his character realizes in the season.

Walking Dead fans will already know Glenn is the one to be killed by Negan in the comics, but that’s certainly not guaranteed to happen in the TV show, considering it’s swerved wildly from the source material in the past. Having said that, Glenn still seems like the likeliest victim of Negan.

Actor Michael Cudlitz appeared to confirm he’s set to be sticking around in the show following the premiere in an interview with Popsugar, saying: ‘Abraham will continue for a while now.’ Of course, fans will know Abraham has long been dead in the source material. Cudlitz’s admission could be a swerve, but we are not sure on this one.

When we last saw Maggie she was already incredibly sick and heavily pregnant with Glen’s child, so could the showrunners potentially rip into our emotional gullets by making her the victim to Negan?

Chandler Riggs has barely discussed the matter of whether he’ll be victim to Negan, probably because most signs are pointing to Carl surviving the ordeal.

Regardless of who Negan ends up killing, though, Rick Grimes himself shares some of the blame for their death, at least according to Walking Dead producer Greg Nicotero. During a recent interview with ComicBook.com, Nicotero laid out why Rick is partially responsible for the lost member of his group, and the creative opportunities a major death such as this affords the show.

Oh bring on the 7th season already!

Leonardo Dicaprio To Produce A Captain Planet Movie!

A new report states that Paramount is in talks to acquire the rights to the popular 1990s cartoon, Captain Planet, and is looking to bring on Jono Matt and Glen Powell to pen the script. More interesting is news that Leonardo DiCaprio will join the film as a producer, should Paramount complete its bid to acquire the film rights.

Recent behind-the-scenes rumblings indicate that DiCaprio’s Appian Way has become interested in the project after recently signing a first-look deal with Paramount. Leo’s interest in the project is not surprising, as he is a noted environmentalist who has spoken about climate change in front of the United Nations, as well as utilizing his Oscar acceptance speech to draw attention to the subject.

So if you’re a Captain Planet fan, and remember the environment-friendly superhero, and his five sidekicks (the Planeteers), there is some hope for you, after all.

Deconstructing An Indian Horror Film

No, I am not talking about Baar Baar Dekho. I am talking about the true blue, quintessential, Indian horror movie. I am talking about the Ramsays, the Bhatts, the Bipashas, and everything in between. I am talking about the sex, and the thrills, and the thrills that come with sex in such movies. But, I digress. Just like the genre.

With Raaz Reboot done (and dusted), its time to analyse, what exactly constitutes a horror film for an Indian moviegoer? Is it the mere fact that there is a ghost lurking somewhere, and we’re supposed to feel scared about it? What about something known as, I don’t know, a script?

Anyway, here I list down how exactly to make an Indian horror film. Wannabe Vikram Bhatts- take note. This is how it’s done.

At the centre of the story, needs to be a woman. Just because it is so much cooler when a woman gets possessed. Aesthetics, see? More often than not, even the ghost that is haunting is also female- a witch, or a chudail. What’s the male equivalent of a chudail I wonder?

Anyway, so a couple, married or otherwise, (depending on what era your film is based), moves to a new city, sometimes country (depending on the producer’s budget), and finds accommodation in a rather obviously haunted house. The woman usually finds this house really beautiful and coaxes the man to stay there. Just women doing women things. The man gives in, grudgingly.

Obviously, the man goes out of the house all day, to earn bread and butter. Just men doing men things. The woman sits around house all day, and waits for the man to return. It is here that a crow, or a raven, or any such conventionally creepy looking bird is introduced to the mix. The bird shows up, and the woman is scared. Obviously. It happens suddenly, that’s why.

At this juncture, she starts seeing things around the house. Objects moving of their own accord. Weird noises. Glass breaking. You know, the works. Just ghosts doing ghost things.

An ominous prediction needs to come from some inconsequential character, usually old in age. This prediction can be made either to the man or woman. We believe in gender equality, that way.

Anyway, after the initial few days, where the man and woman make love to each other seemingly on a daily basis, and in much detail, now things become tense between them. The woman says the house is haunted (women seem to believe in ghosts more easily than men) but the man doesn’t believe her. This will go on till at least half the movie, till the time, the woman is completely possessed by the spirit. When that happens, and things become obvious that she is possessed, there’s sometimes another entry. The entry of the third wheel. The character who claims to know everything, about everything, but is mysterious in his ways. Now, there are two ways to go about it- one, the woman falls for him, and he becomes her hero, two, its still her husband/boyfriend who is trying to protect her, in which case this third wheel becomes inconsequential, and must die.

Also, did we mention, that this ghost knows all the demon symbols, of every possible religion. It shows signs of what it wants, talks in a digitally edited voice (thats creepy, of course, haven’t you heard Farhan Akhtar sing?), and usually doesn’t negotiate. At least two minor characters need to die. It can be the Padre, the Pandit, the Kazi, the best friend, the other best friend, the mysterious dude who was helping them- any two from the above.

Eventually, a God chant helps, and the demon is killed. Just God doing God things. The woman is saved. And all is well with the world.

Mix this film with some good music (which is actually a rehash of the same music from the previous horror film), and intersperse it with some hot love making sequences. Because nothing goes as well as sex and horror.

Voila, the script of Raaz 5 is ready. Or is it going to be Raaz Re-Reboot?

The Most Undeserving Smita Patil Awardee- Is Katrina Kaif A Victim Of Her Own Superstardom?

Okay, she is beautiful. She dances amazingly well. We’ll give her that. Oh, and she recently won the Smita Patil Memorial Award, which is conferred to actresses who have given great acting performances intheir career (at least that’s what we are told). Some would argue that she is a commercially successful star, and you can’t argue with success. But the recent failure of another one of her movies- Baar Baar Dekho, begs the question- how exactly is Katrina a superstar?

Phantom (2015) was appreciated by the critics, and managed to do some business, owing to its word of mouth publicity. But given the costs involved in the making of the film, it will still be considered a flop. Fitoor (2016) came with high expectations, but was panned by the audiences and critics alike. Her performance was especially singled out for criticism, especially since her co-star Aditya Roy Kapoor is still considered a newbie , and Fitoor was almost riding on her. Then came Baar Baar Dekho. This time too, she paired up with a relative newcomer, Siddharth Malhotra. This time too, her film sank without a trace.

Katrina Kaif plays a half British, half Indian girl, born in the UK, in Baar Baar Dekho- a smart move on director Nitya Mehra’s part to justify her accent. Otherwise, there was no implication of this particular character trait on the movie. But that is not the long term solution. She can’t be playing half British characters in all her films. Usually it is the actors who adjust themselves to suit the needs of the character they’re playing. Here, the situation is the complete opposite. The character is being adjusted to suit Katrina. Its almost as if the director knows that Katrina is not going to put in any effort to change her accent or try and suit the character.

Some would say it’s her choice of films, that is her undoing. While I partially agree (exception- Phantom was a decent film and should’ve done better), I would still like to point out that Katrina’s acting abilities are well below par. Phantom, for instance, would have been instantly elevated, had there been a better performer for Katrina’s part. The scene in which she pretends to be giving birth is particularly awful.

Even after working in more than 30 films, she is still a one note actress. Even her accent hasn’t improved. And we, the Indian cinegoers, let it slide for more than a decade. But there seems to be an awakening of sorts, at least when it comes to Katrina. Her performances sometimes are laughably bad, and now the audience knows it.

When she was working with the Khans and the Akshay Kumars, the films didn’t depend on her performances. She was supposed to look good, smile a lot, dance her heart out. Good acting wasn’t on the agenda. But believe it or not, the quality of cinema in the past decade has really improved, and that has meant an improvement in the acting standards also. This is the reason why a Kangana is commanding more respect (and according to recent reports, more money too) than Katrina. Maybe Katrina would’ve been better suited to stick to her tried and tested formula. While we laud her for trying out something new, it also exposed her weaknesses.

For all her beauty and grace, Katrina needs to act better to survive in an industry whose collective acting standards are improving. Alia Bhatt, Kareena Kapoor Khan, Priyanka Chopra, Deepika Padukone, and Parineeti Chopra are all better actresses than her, and have consistently given stand out performances. Katrina needs to find hers, and soon. Another critically panned performance, and she might find herself out of favor with the producers. After all, this is an unforgiving industry.

She’s beautiful and dances amazingly well. But sadly, that is not enough anymore.

Is The Star Driven Model Failing?

With the recent release (and subsequent failure) of Mohenjo Daro, Disney has officially stalled its India operations. They were, until recently working with UTV in India. The partnership worked well, till it didn’t. The movies started flopping one after the other, and Mohenjo Daro is a colossal addition to the list. The movie has raked in losses to the tune of 90 crores plus.

But why was the cost of production so high in the first place? Agreed, it was a period film, which requires elaborate sets and high production value, but it is said that Hrithik was paid a whopping 20 crores for the film. These 20 crores bloated the budget of the film. And UTV bought this film for roughly 95 crores. Obviously the movie had an uphill battle to climb. It might still be able to recoup some of its losses, but rest assured, this film will go in the annals of film history as one of the biggest failures.

And this film isn’t the first one. Last year, Bombay Velvet met with the same fate. A lot of this has to be attributed to our propensity to pay actors way above what they deserve. Sure, having a Salman in your film ensures bums on seats in a theatre, but a Hrithik, who comes with a similar price tag, does not guarantee instant success.The problem is the remuneration of these stars. And more importantly, the remuneration of their support staff. Everyone, from their managers to their personal assistants, to their make up artistes to their drivers are paid for by the producers. A producer recently claimed that the remuneration of a certain star’s driver was, in total, more than what was paid to the scriptwriter of the film. The result? Mediocre cinema. Which is now falling flat.

The problem is the remuneration of these stars. And more importantly, the remuneration of their support staff. Everyone, from their managers to their personal assistants, to their make up artistes to their drivers are paid for by the producers. A producer recently claimed that the remuneration of a certain star’s driver was, in total, more than what was paid to the scriptwriter of the film. The result? Mediocre cinema. Which is now falling flat.
This is the very reason why the Bhatts continue to make profits, even out of their biggest flops. The budgets are strictly contained, and a lot of money is made from the music rights and the digital rights of the film. New directors helm most of these movies, and hence the cost of production is marginal.

Stars need to be put in check. The larger than life star of yesteryears has now given way to a newer generation of realistic heroes (Nawazuddin, Irrfan, Rajkumar Rao). The films which have these men in the lead, have a far lesser chance of failing, as the stakes are always low. Sure, a Raman Raghav won’t break the records of a Dabangg, but any movie, which can be considered good, and yet make a profit, is a success in today’s day and age.